making damson jam

October 27, 2009 at 3:00 pm 17 comments

damson jam jarsWe’re not big jam eaters in our house but with so many damsons to use up from the allotment I took my first tentative steps into the world of jam making.  With fine results I’m pleased to say.  This Sensational Preserves recipe uses orange and cinnamon to enhance the flavour of the damsons and recommends a 10-15 minute delay before potting the jam up to prevent the fruit skins from floating to the surface of the jam in the jars.damson jam making

1.1kg/2.5lb damsons
1.1kg/2.5lb sugar
1.5 tsp ground cinnamon
grated zest and juice of 3 oranges

  • Make the squeezed orange juice up to 300ml/10 fl oz with water then put in a pan with the damsons, cinnamon and orange zest and cook gently in the liquid for about 40 minutes until the fruit is very tender. *
  • Over a low heat, stir in the sugar until it has dissolved.  Raise the heat and boil for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until setting point is reached.
  • Remove from the heat and take out the damson stones with a slotted spoon.  Put the stones into a non-metallic sieve to drain for about 15 minutes. (*I chose to remove the stones with my fingers before adding the sugar)
  • Skim the surface with a spoon.  Stir the jam then spoon into warm, clean, dry jars.  Cover and seal.  Leave overnight to set.  Store in a cool, dry, dark place. damson jam on spoon
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Entry filed under: allotment tales, in the kitchen. Tags: , .

National Apple Day in Gloucester brie baked apples

17 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Ann  |  October 27, 2009 at 6:52 pm

    Well done with another yummy recipe, looks delicious.

    Reply
  • 2. miss m  |  October 27, 2009 at 8:31 pm

    Lovely Nic ! I think I gained a pound just looking at it. Yum, yum !

    I’m getting fruit trees for the garden next year. Damson is on the list.

    Reply
    • 3. Nip it in the bud  |  October 28, 2009 at 2:40 pm

      thanks for the compliment Miss M. Ask around to see if anyone already has a damson tree – our’s forms new little trees from time to time that can be dug out and transplanted elsewhere (not sure if they root from the tree or grow from dropped fruit). Could save you a fortune and it’s lovely to know where you trees have come from

      Reply
  • 4. Kiki  |  October 28, 2009 at 11:52 am

    Your blog is absolutely beautiful! Gorgeous recipes..this looks very lovely and unique! Great photography all around! Nice to meet you..I will enjoy visiting your blog often!

    Reply
    • 5. Nip it in the bud  |  October 28, 2009 at 2:42 pm

      thank you for your lovely comments Kiki and I’m glad you’ve enjoyed your morning with me down on the plot ;o) I’m off there now to plant some onion bulbs (in spite of what I said last week!). Can’t waste that freshly dug soil now can I

      Reply
  • 6. Lynne  |  August 5, 2011 at 11:45 am

    I made some of this, and WOW! It is the most intensely gorgeous jam I have ever made or eaten – much nicer than ordinary damson jam. The only change I made was lowering the sugar content, as we like our jam to be very tangy. Thankyou so much, and now I’m going to make some damson chutney to sell at our garage sale in aid of a rescue lurcher who needs cancer treatment at Lurcher SOS.

    Reply
  • 7. Nip it in the bud  |  August 5, 2011 at 12:03 pm

    what lovely feedback Lynne, thanks so much. You’ll not be disappointed with the damson chutney either – several people have said it’s the best chutney they’ve ever had. The tree is bursting with damsons so I’m looking forward to restocking the shelves.
    All the best with the fundraising.

    Reply
  • 8. vicky  |  September 16, 2011 at 1:16 pm

    how many jars does this make . I am buying jars so just a rough idea would be great. thanks.
    I cant wait to try it with home made scones. yummmmy!!

    Reply
  • 9. vicky  |  September 16, 2011 at 1:18 pm

    does this recipe use preserve sugar or normal please advise. thanks

    Reply
    • 10. Nip it in the bud  |  September 16, 2011 at 2:48 pm

      Hi Vicky, I like to use small jars so from doubling up my latest batch produced about 12 jars. So I’d say 4-5 lbish size jars (regular honey size) from a single batch.

      Using normal sugar is fine for this jam as there’s plenty of pectin in the damsons to help with the set.

      Happy jamming :o)

      Reply
  • 11. Lynne  |  September 29, 2011 at 11:27 am

    We sold some of this at our garage sale, and one of the ladies who bought it says it is divine and she’s eaten the lot! It’s definitely my favourite of the seven jams we made this year. Thanks again for a wonderful recipe, Nic x

    Reply
    • 12. Nip it in the bud  |  September 29, 2011 at 12:46 pm

      divine is how I describe it as there is nothing like it in the shops and it’s just so special. I have some more damsons in the freezer for making another batch for Christmas pressies. So pleased to hear you did well raising funds from selling your jams.

      Reply
  • 13. Joanna  |  September 3, 2012 at 6:09 pm

    This is really fab – thanks for sharing the recipe.

    Reply
  • 14. barrie  |  September 22, 2016 at 10:54 pm

    That was too easy. Thanks for the recipe, I haven’t made jam since Home Ec class 15 years ago. I was really happy with how this turned out. For years the damsons growing all around our house have been going to waste. No longer!

    For my tastes the 1.5 tsp cinnamon was a little too much, i might try using none next time just to experience the full damson flavor!. Also, after cooking the damsons i mashed them through a vegetable steamer. The holes were big enough to let everything through easily while leaving the stones and skin behind.

    Reply
    • 15. Nip it in the bud  |  September 23, 2016 at 11:27 am

      Hi Barrie, thanks for taking the time to share your feedback, it is a great recipe. I love your tip about using a steamer to sieve the stones, I will definitely be trying that next time I make it. I don’t have the allotment anymore so I’ll have to go out foraging. Happy jam eating

      Reply
  • 16. maxine  |  November 14, 2016 at 2:10 am

    This recipe make very delicious jam, I also use a sieve, mine was metal stainlsess mesh, with a little elbow grease I pushed the sugar added jam through the sieve with a large spoon which eliminated the skin and stones making for a smooth delicious Jam.

    Reply
    • 17. Nip it in the bud  |  November 15, 2016 at 9:17 pm

      thanks for taking the time to share your experience Maxine. So pleased you like the recipe and have some delicious jars of jam to see you through the winter :o)

      Reply

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