U is for …

September 8, 2011 at 9:09 am 3 comments

uninspired by this letter!
I could say I’m a bit untidy but the last few months I’ve gone de-clutter crazy and become a bit of a neat freak…  Unconventional?  Perhaps by some people’s standards…  I can only think of un- words in a fairly half-hearted ‘not this, not that‘ kind of way so I’ve settled on a U that’s a regular feature of allotment life.

I have mixed feelings about Urtica Dioica, the latin name for the common Nettle.
The growth of nettles on wasteland is said to indicate nutrient rich soil so we tolerate them in swathes round the trees or growing up through our compost areas.  If I was gardening in the Middle Ages I’d leave them be too believing they protected against sorcery and marked the dwelling place of elves*!

I have been known to collect the tips to make a herbal brew or use nettles like spinach in lasagne but it’s rather labour intensive.  The one place on the plot where nettles are shown no mercy is the strawberry bed where  picking fruit has become a bit of an extreme sport and we rarely manage it without much cussing and prickles.
* according to Jekka McVicar’s Complete Herb Book

Advertisements

Entry filed under: A-Z challenge, allotment tales.

Jekka’s Herb Farm open days W is for …

3 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Everlovin' Dad  |  September 8, 2011 at 6:11 pm

    Ubiquitous; “present everywhere or in several places simultaneously” !!! sounds like your nettles and……..
    Universal..

    Reply
  • 2. Mel (Formerly Fiona Mayhem)  |  January 3, 2012 at 3:04 am

    There is a brilliant pesto recipe using nettles in the River Cottage Bread book – using breadcrumbs instead of pine nuts and heddar instead of parmesan. I really recommend it!

    U is also for the Umbellifers – carrots, parsley, dill, fennel, celery, caraway, chervil, parsnips, and loads of others.

    Reply
  • 3. Nip it in the bud  |  January 3, 2012 at 10:42 am

    Dad – U was certainly a tricky one. I like your random thinking!

    Mel – I’m very good at collecting up nettle tops and then not actually doing anything with them! The most I’ve managed is using them a bit spinach like in lasagne as it takes so many to make a soup. Nice tip though – I have a River Cottage book so will check it out.

    Perhaps my U should have been ‘uneducated’ as I’ve never heard the term umbellifers! Thanks for sharing your gardening wisdom :o)

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


About Nip it in the bud


Welcome to my once-about-gardening-and-cooking blog that is now mostly about our life in Gloucester with a boy, a baby and 3 cats.

If you like what you found why not subscribe to email updates

Follow Nip it in the bud on WordPress.com

Blog Stats

  • 423,117 hits

Archives

A Gardeners Voice Featured Blog!
TOTS 100 - UK Parent Blogs

%d bloggers like this: