Posts filed under ‘5 ways with …’

five ways with … a ton of apples

In honour of World Apple Day on 21st October I thought it was high time I did an apple round up (a bit of a cheat I know but needs must when blogging time is tight!). So here are a few of my favourite recipes if you find yourself with an apple or ten knocking about (see original post for recipe information)

brie baked apples

.apple and berry cordials

apple herb jellies
17-9-10 - mint jelly on spoon 4B

mock goose (potato) bake
Mock goose served

curried apple and carrot chutney
The Folk Museum in Gloucester will be hosting their fabulous National Apple Day
on Saturday 26th October from 10am – 4pm. Perhaps we’ll see you there?

ps. this is my new favourite apple dessert but I haven’t posted about it yet so it’s a bonus 6th option (or at the very least a note to self to get it written up before the blog link that inspired it is lost, the pictures eventually remembered and the recipe cobbled together like the Mock Goose!)29-9-13 - sour apple pie - served up with ice cream 4B

October 17, 2013 at 9:05 pm 3 comments

five ways with … a ton of beetroot

Beetroot was one of my star vegetables this year.  I harvested bunch after bunch in August/September and thanks to a late sowing in July I was still lifting beets in November.  With heaps of beetroot available you’d think I’d be trying a new recipe each week.  Quite the opposite is true – I love munching on freshly boiled, still warm, beetroots so much I’m hard pushed to venture to the B section of my recipe books.

I have from time to time you’ll be pleased to hear so my ‘5 ways with…‘ is not simply to boil/grate/roast/mash/soup them.  I am going to cheat a bit though by including a couple of recipes already put to the test but I think that’s forgivable in the run up to Christmas!

1.  Beetroot and Walnut Hummus
Hugh Fernley Whittingstalls recipe from River Cottage Everyday’

  • 50g walnuts
  • 1 tbsp cuminseeds
  • 25g stale bread, crusts removed
  • 200g cooked beetroot (not pickled), cut into cubes
  • 1 tbsp tahini (I didn’t have any so used whole sesame seeds)
  • 1 large garlic clove, crushed
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • A little olive or rapeseed oil (optional)
  • How to make beetroot and walnut hummus (serves 4)

    1. Put the walnuts on a baking tray and toast in an oven preheated to 180°C/Gas Mark 4 for 5-7 minutes, until fragrant. Leave to cool.

    2. Warm a small frying pan over a medium heat. Add the cumin seeds and dry-fry them, shaking the pan almost constantly, until they start to darken and release their aroma – this should take less than a minute, so be careful not to burn them. Crush the seeds with a pestle and mortar or a spice grinder.

    3. Break the bread into small chunks, put in a food processor or blender with the walnuts and blitz until fine. Add the beetroot, tahini, most of the garlic, a good pinch of the cumin, half the lemon juice, a little salt and a good grind of pepper, then blend to a thick paste.

    4. Taste the mixture and adjust it by adding a little more cumin, garlic, lemon, salt and/or pepper, blending again until you are happy with it. Loosen with a dash of oil if you think it needs it. Refrigerate until required but bring back to room temperature to serve.

    2. Beetroot Chutney
    from ‘Clearly Delicious: an illustrated guide to preserving, pickling.  and bottling’.
    A simple, low sugar recipe that can be eaten immediately.

  • 2 cooking apples
  • 1 onion
  • 240 ml (8 fl oz) malt vinegar
  • 10 ml (2 tsp) freshly grated root ginger
  • 5 ml (1 tsp) ground allspice
  • 2 whole cloves
  • 450g (cooked beetroots, leave unpeeled to cook to stop them ‘bleeding‘)
  • 50g (2 oz) dark muscovado sugar
  • 50g (2 oz) raisins
  • 1. Core and slice apples.  Peel and slice onion.  Put both into pan and bring to the boil with the vinegar, root ginger, allspice and cloves.  Simmer, stirring occasionally for 20 minutes.
    2. Peel the cooked beetroots, finely chop and add to the pan with the sugar and raisin.  Bring to the boil and simmer for 15 minutes.
    3. Spoon into sterilized jars, seal and label.

    3. Beetroot and Horseradish Relish
    from ‘Recipes for self-healing; a lively 5 minute relish using cooked beetroot.

  • 4 beetroot
  • 1 onion
  • 1 tsp fresh parsley
  • 4 tbsp horseradish
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp mild honey
  • salt
    Chop or grate the beetroot finely.  Chop the onion and parsley finely and grate the horseradish or us ready prepared horseradish from a jar (in which case use a little less vinegar).  Combine all the ingredients and let them sit for a while, the longer the better, before serving.  The recipe will make 2-3 cups and will keep for weeks in a sealed container in the fridge 

    4. Beetroot and Chocolate Muffins
    recipe previously posted here

    .
    5. Oven baked Beetroot Risotto
    recipe previously posted here

     

  • December 12, 2010 at 6:35 pm 17 comments

    five ways with… a ton of damsons

    damsons branch by shed 16-8-09*Not literally a ton of damsons… 1% of a ton in fact.  But it’s a ton of work picking, stoning and preserving  10 kilos of damsons.  Don’t let that put you off if you spot a tree though, they’re well worth the effort.  I’ll post full recipe details shortly but in the meantime here’s my Times on-line style ‘5 ways with …‘ spotlight on damsons.  Drum roll please, in order of success and recommendation here are my tried and tested

    5 ways with … damsons
    (quantities here are the amounts I used not the amounts you need to have!)

    dambeena 4kg of damsons boiled and strained to make 3.5 litres of Pam Corbin’s dambeena cordial.  Unlike other cordials or jellies the leftover fruit pulp can be saved to make a delicious pie filling, a hot sauce to pour over ice-cream or mixed with double cream.  4kg of fruit pulp after straining and removing the stones produced 4 jam jars of puree. Damson cordial side view

    damson jam 1.1kg made about 6 jars of jam.  I was thrilled to bits with how tasty my first ever jam making attempt turned out and it was given a big thumbs up by our visitors last week.  Hints of citrus and cinnamon intesified the flavour of the damsons beautifully.  (click here for recipe)Damson jam - close up

    damson muffins I found this recipe in a copy of Waitrose Food magazine from September 2007 (thanks for letting me pinch it Lei).  It uses oil and yoghurt instead of butter and the damsons cook beautifully added raw to the sugared cake mix.  I had a wonderful assistant for this batch of baking but you’ll have to wait to find out who…  (update: damson muffins recipe here)damson muffins cut up *

    damson chutney 1.35kg of damsons made into a dozen 110ml jars of Delia’s spiced damson chutney.  It cooks down to a very soft jam like consistency and is delicately spiced with cloves, all spice and ginger.  (click here for recipe)damson chutney_spooned

    freezing damsons to delay decision making about other recipes to try!  3kg, about 10 litres, de-stoned while watching a film with George (be warned it’ll take about 40 minutes per kilo and requires a big dose of patience and a not easily irritated husband!).  I’ve still got purple stained fingers and a sore thumb so I’d recommend wearing latex gloves for this.  Damsons - 10 litre*

    bottling damsons 1.2kg bottled in syrup.  I used kilner jars and wasn’t convinced that the seals were airtight because drops of liquid kept seaping out of the side and puddling on the worktop for about a week after.  Initially I I thought it was fermenting (suspicious looking bubbles at the top of the jar) but it seems to have dried off now and the bubbles have gone.  If I bottled fruit again I’d use jam jars and I can’t really vouch for the success of this method yet.  At least there shouldn’t be any bacteria in the jar as I topped them off with spoonful of cherry brandy.damsons in syrup

    If you thought you’d spotted a deliberate mistake there with 6 options I don’t  think ‘freezing‘ really qualifies as a recipe!   I’m not really advocating bottling either so I actually need to offer you one more don’t I?  How about an alternative use for damson jam and a swirly dance with some cream to make  Steve Parle’s perfect damson ripple ice-cream.  Summer sunshine and melting ice creams may be long forgotten but don’t you just want to lean in and give this a lick!   Steve Parle's damson ice creamSteve Parle is a former River Cafe cook and writes food posts for the Observer Organic Allotment blog. I’ve not made Steve’s ice-cream yet so this is his blog photo not mine.

    October 15, 2009 at 12:18 pm 16 comments


    About Nip it in the bud


    Welcome to my once-about-gardening-and-cooking blog that is now mostly about our life in Gloucester with a boy, a baby and 3 cats.

    If you like what you found why not subscribe to email updates

    Follow Nip it in the bud on WordPress.com

    Blog Stats

    • 420,725 hits

    Archives

    A Gardeners Voice Featured Blog!
    TOTS 100 - UK Parent Blogs